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WaterColor Step by Step Guide

10 SimpleWater Color Techniques for Beginner Artist • By Artist: Ruby Kaur Singh @ ArtRubyS.com Watercolor can be intimidating for beginners, and even some experienced artists find it challenging. • But I feel Art is a Meditation or Prayer because once I get into the zone, I am out of this world. • In fact, throughout my years teaching the medium, I’ve met many talented acrylic and oil painters who have a hard time switching over to watercolor because it just works so differently. • Watercolor really works, get comfortable with your paints, and hopefully, come up with ideas for new creations. • Watercolor painters have historically used paper, but the texture of the paper differs significantly. • The white of the painting surface will always shine through, adding to the painting's luminosity. www.ArtRubyS.com Ruby Kaur Singh

With these simple warm-up activities, you’ll begin to understand how • Watercolor Artists use other painting techniques such as washes, wet-on-wet, and wet-on-dry, lifting out and masking out for highlights, to create textural results. • Watercolor painting is a process in which pigments are combined with water to create a painting. • Since watercolor is thin washes and transparent color, it is renowned for its inherent attractiveness and subtlety more than any other form of painting.


Getting to Know Watercolor Painting • With these simple warm-up activities, you’ll begin to understand how watercolor really works, get comfortable with your paints, and hopefully come up with ideas for new creations. • Watercolor painters have historically used paper, but the texture of the paper differs significantly. The white of the painting surface will always shine through, adding to the painting's luminosity.


Artist: RubyKaur Singh Getting to KnowWatercolor Painting • Watercolor can be intimidating for beginners, and even some experienced artists find it challenging. • In fact, throughout my years teaching the medium, I’ve met many talented acrylic and oil painters who have a hard time switching over to watercolor because it just works so differently. • Watercolor Artists use other painting techniques such as washes, wet-on-wet, and wet-on-dry, lifting out and masking out for highlights, to create textural results.


Painting with Watercolors: What You'll Need • Watercolor can be Beginners also have no idea how to use watercolor paints or what to expect from this unique art medium. • Watercolor paint is an endless source of enjoyment when understood. It does, however, have a rather playful personality. • It's not always easy to keep pigment and water under control. Because of the clarity required, watercolors can be difficult to learn and manage. • You may make a mistake with your brush. • On the other hand, these unanticipated events should be regarded as an opportunity rather than a failure because they enhance your enjoyment of the painting process.



Choosing Watercolor Brushes • Start with a flat wash brush and round brushes in sizes 10 and 4. • Due to the high cost of sable brushes, you will want to look for synthetic and synthetic/sable blends that imitate pure sable when buying your first collection. • When painting, the painting brush should point accurately and maintain its form, carry a generous amount of paint, and be supple and springy, regardless of the material used to produce it.

Wet on Wet Effect 1. Start by wetting your brush with plain water and “painting” two rectangles. 2. The rectangles will be hard to see because there's no pigment, but if you tilt your head a bit, you will be able to see where you have applied the water. 3. Pick up moistened paint from your palette and add color to your wet rectangle. 4. In this image, I’m simply sliding my brush from side to side.


Wet on Wet Effect • There are a couple of basic ways to paint with watercolor. • The wet-on-wet method is typically used for painting landscapes, simple skies, or soft watercolor washes because the effect gives us a nice flowy look that can be applied in different ways. • Basically, we’re adding wet paint to a wet surface. • Here’s a simple activity that can help familiarize you with this technique.


Color And Its Use 1. By mixing three primary colors: yellow, red, and blue, you can create other colors. 2. To begin, all you need is a yellow that is both warm and cool, a blue that is both warm and cool, and a red that is both warm and cool. 3. You will save money on supplies if you have a detailed understanding of watercolor techniques. 4. Unlike acrylic and oil paint, you do not need to prepare.


Color And Its Use



Artist: Ruby Kaur Singh ColorAnd Its Use 1. By mixing three primary colors: yellow, red, and blue, you can create other colors. 2. To begin, all you need is a yellow that is both warm and cool, a blue that is both warm and cool, and a red that is both warm and cool. 3. You will save money on supplies you have a detailed understanding of watercolor techniques. 4. Unlike acrylic and oil paint, you do not need to prepare

Color And Its Use • By mixing three primary colors: yellow, red, and blue, you can create other colors. • To begin, all you need is a yellow that is both warm and cool, a blue that is both warm and cool, and a red that is both warm and cool. • You will save money on supplies if you have a detailed understanding of watercolor techniques. • Unlike acrylic and oil paint, you do not need to prepare

Artist: Ruby Kaur Singh • Start with a flat wash brush and round brushes in sizes 10 and 4. • Due to the high cost of sable brushes, you will want to look for synthetic and synthetic/sable blends that imitate pure sable when buying your first collection. • When painting, the painting brush should point accurately and maintain its form, carry a generous amount of paint, and be supple and springy, regardless of the material used to produce it.

Artist: Ruby Kaur Singh

• You'll also need watercolor paper and a palette to blend and dilute the paint to make various shades. • Other things you'll need are masking tape, water, a clean paper towel or cloth, and a board or clipboard to stick the paper to the drawing surface.


Color Wheel Chart

• A color wheel is a well-known tool for demonstrating the relationship between primary and secondary colors such as red, purple, blue, orange, green, and yellow. • On the color wheel, there are three primary colors and three secondary colors.

Colors that pop • Primary colors are red, yellow, and blue, while secondary colors are orange, purple, and green, formed by mixing two primary colors. • Intermediate colors are the colors that fall between primary and secondary on the color wheel. • Understanding the color wheel helps with color mixing and application. • To make a genuinely vibrant painting, you must first choose your colors. • If you try to replicate all of the colors you see in front of you, they will fight for your attention; but, if you restrict the colors you use in a painting to contrasting opposites, such as red and green, you will find that the colors reinforce the vibrancy of one another. Toning of Colors •You can make several colors varying from light to dark by changing the paint amount paint. •Often lighten stains with water rather than white color, which renders colors invisible. • if you want to keep the paint's transparency. Artist: RubyKaur Singh

Color Arrangement • Watercolour paints make it easy to mix new colors in a palette or on paper. • The ten-colour basic palette recommended includes the three primary colors, green, and browns, allowing you to create a wide range of colors. • Specific colors come in different shades; for example, reds come in two shades: cadmium red and the bluer alizarin crimson. • When you mix different shades with other colors, they respond differently, resulting in a wider variety of colors.


Restriction on Your Pallet • A painting is bound and unified using a small palette of colors adjacent to the color • will have a particular amount of that color. You can create a variety of harmonious neutrals and semi-neutrals by using a complementary color in your palette and also helps to unify the painting. • In your artwork, a small amount of pure complementary color will attract attention to the composition and improve the vibrancy of the colors. •At this point, the paint is dry. Take note of how the colors fade at this stage can look very different. •Finally, observe the transparency of your paintings by the wetness and flow of water and the fine qualities created. Often keep in mind that water flows from wet to less wet. •A damp paint region will try to find balance by rushing into a less wet area. Pigments are transported from one site to another by water. Furthermore, water evaporates and dries quickly. • As a result, your time to play with the paint is limited; thus, it's best to use a lot of water in your mixes and keep colored washes wet while working.

Wet-on-wet Technique • There are a few basic fundamental techniques of watercolor painting. • Since it provides an excellent fluid effect in several ways, the wet-on-wet method is suitable for landscapes, simple skies, and light watercolor washes. • To start, wet your brush with plain water and use it to "paint" two rectangles. 1. Wet the surface on which you want to paint. 2. Pick up moistened paint from your palette to add color to your wet surface. 3. This exercise is excellent for setting a benchmark for how much water and colors you want to use.


Wet-on-dry Technique

• Wet-on-dry is a method for achieving more detailed and determined shapes.

• Start with a dry piece of paper. Pick up some moistened paint with a broad brush and start painting.

• The amount of water you use determines the opacity of your color. It would help if you also tried experimenting with drier colors.

• To get the paint going, using the smallest amount of water possible. It will have a slightly different texture, almost sketch-like.

• In addition to working on brush control, you will start to notice beautiful watercolor textures appearing. This depends on how much water you use, the type of paper, and how fast you move.

• Repeat this simple practice exercise as many times as you feel necessary. It’s a great way to get into the illustration-style watercolor groove.


How to Start Paint with Water Colors
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